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Vintage Spool Curtain Tie Back

Jan 24, 2017 By Jessica Abbott
Vintage Spool Curtain Tie Back

When it comes to curtains, I like to keep it simple. Fabric that matches my decor yet can be easily switched out when the decorating bug hits in a few years, and I decide to redo my room to match a new favorite color pallet. I blame my addiction to home renovating magazines paired with my love for fabric and DIY projects. A simple curtain rod and curtain clips are my favorite ways to easily hang fabric art in every window. But the attention is always in the details…

Like these vintage thread spools. You can find them in almost every antique shop, gorgeous wood worn spools and bobbins just waiting for you to snatch them up for your collection. I have more than a few hanging out on display in my sewing studio and thought it would be fun to use them in a more practical way.

Hi, I’m Jess Abbot from The Sewing Rabbit here to show you how to make this simple vintage spool curtain tie back.

curtain tie back

curtain tie back

curtain tie back

curtain tie back

curtain tie back

How to make a vintage spool curtain tie back.

Skill level: Knowledge of working power tools
Time Needed: 30 min – 1 hour

Materials Needed:
Vintage Wooden Spool or Bobbin, with a hole down the middle
Measuring Tape
● Pen/pencil
● Power drill
● Drill bit (see your anchors for size needed)
● Anchors (if drilling into drywall)
● Hanger Bolts
● Hammer
● Coupling nuts
● Threaded rod

curtain tie back

Curtain Fabric Seen in Photos:
Nate Berkus Home Decor Print Fabric-Jatte Paramount Baltic

Instructions:

curtain tie back

1. Measure where you want your tie back spool to be on the side of the window, and mark. Make sure you leave enough room for the circumference of the bottom spool (as you can see, I had to remark further away from the window to accommodate the spool’s bottom circle.)

2. Determine the size drill bit you need by looking at the instructions on the anchor package. Drill a hole into your wall where marked using the recommended drill bit size.

curtain tie back

3. Carefully tap the anchor into the hole in your wall, until the anchor is flush.

curtain tie back

curtain tie back

curtain tie back

4. Hanger bolts are threaded on both sides so that you can screw it into the wall and still have an exposed screw for fastening things. At my local hardware store, I was only able to find a hanger bolt 4” in length, which is why I needed to add length with a coupling nut and threaded rod so that the spool would be secure. Screw the pointed end of the hanger bolt directly into your anchor. I simply used my fingers and screwed them into the wall, so as not to damage the threaded bolt. Alternatively, you can screw on a nut, and use a wrench to then screw the bolt directly into the wall.

5. Screw the hanger bolt into the wall, leaving 1” of the exposed screw on the outside of the wall.

6. Thread the coupling nut onto the end of the hanger bolt so that the coupling nut is flush with the wall.

curtain tie back

7. Screw the threaded rod into the coupling nut, so that it is secured nice and tight. (Depending on the length of your threaded rod, you may need to cut it down to size. A simple hacksaw will cut through it easily. The gentleman at my local hardware store actually cut it down to size for me when asked.)

curtain tie back

8. Slip the vintage spool directly over the threaded rod, and you are finished!

curtain tie back

The spool will be easily removable when it comes time for a change, yet secure with the length of threaded rod that it will not fall off.

curtain tie back

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